APPENDIX 1b  (Subsidiary Musical Index)

WORKS FOR WHICH COWARD PROBABLY WROTE MUSIC, BUT FOR WHICH DOCUMENTATION OF ONLY THE LYRIC SURVIVES (MUSIC LOST)

ALL THINGS BRIGHT AND BEAUTIFUL (1953)

A typed lyric sheet shows this song to have been the introductory number for an early draft of After The Ball  (running just before 'Oh What a Century...').  The stage direction is, "Two boys enter to music, dressed in the uniform of the Church Lads Brigade".  But it's really not a very strong comedy lyric, which it needed to be in this position, and maybe it set the wrong mood.  In any case, there is no evidence that it had a very long pre-production life; and the music now appears to be lost.

ANNA THE AUCTIONEER  (1917)
An unused song from the Darewski lyric notebook.  While this lyric has been more or less in the public domain for some time, the music has never been less than lost.  We base our assumption that there was music on account of a long, well-ordered lyric, specifying 'Verse' and 'Refrain' sections, in the notebook. 

BERTHA FROM BALHAM (1917)
A letter written by NC to his mother from Manchester in July 1917 mentions that a song of this title was  'to be placed with Margaret Cooper'.  This letter also told about the genesis of WHEN YOU COME HOME ON LEAVE (q.v. main index), so it is possible that as there was some input from Max Darewski to the genesis of the latter song, there may also have been some Darewski contribution to this one.  In January 1918 a profile of Margaret Cooper in Talk of the Town  mentioned that she was singing one of Coward's songs;  and while some would consider this a "known performance" and thus qualify the number for the main index, it cannot be said for definite that 'Bertha' was the song sung by Miss Cooper. 

BERTIE (I'M BERTIE FROM THE BATH CLUB) (1922)
Coward mentioned this song, among others, in a letter to his mother from Davos at Christmastime 1922, when he was in the first throes of putting together material for London Calling!:  "I'm writing [Maisie Gay] a male impersonator burlesque, 'I'm Bertie from The Bath Club, but I've never learned to swim'.  However, the song is not to be found in the archives beyond a short 9-line refrain lyric, and it was not used beyond the planning stage of the revue.

BUNCH, BUNCH (1920's)
A celebration in song (a girls' chorus) of the musical comedian Nelson 'Bunch' Keys - who had lent Noël £50 in September 1922.

CO-OCTOGENERIANS (1927)
The lyric reveals this as a number celebrating the longevity of the Co-Optimists, with different verses ascribed to six named members of the troupe.  As the chorus lines between the verses consist entirely of "Bow wow!", it is fairly reasonable to assume that the number was intended for - probably included in - a revue featuring the Co-Optimists cast called The Bow-Wows of  December 1927.  Unfortunately, the rather jokey Bow-wows programme does not really help, since no number has this title.  It is most likely that the song was either the opening number ("Bow-Wows - They're off") or the second half opener ("They're off again.").  The music has not surfaced.

DAMN GOOD SHOW (1949)
A number mapped out for inclusion in the abortive Hoi Polloi of 1949, which did not survive its transmogrification into Ace of Clubs.  It is a lyric forerunner of the celebratory 'London' number in The Girl Who Came to Supper, LONDON IS A LITTLE BIT OF ALLRIGHT.

DON'T LET FATHER SEE THE FRESCOES (1961)
A number included in plans for Sail Away, but which was dropped before rehearsal.
DREAM YOUR DREAM AGAIN (c.1919)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics.  It was apparently intended to be included in an unfinished play, Copy Katt, in a tea-party scene, during which this 'waltz' was to be played.  Sounds like the same sort of thing as FAITH (q.v.)

ELIZABETH MAY (1918?)
While Sheridan Morley was researching his 1969 biography of Coward, he encountered a lady who was at Oakham with the Women's Legion at the time Noël had been there "singing a song of his which began: 'My name's Elizabeth May/And no one takes liberties with me.'  'I have never', notes the lady rather sadly, 'heard this since'." [SM1]  The complete lyric, specifying 'verse' and 'refrain' sections, has recently been unearthed by Barry Day among the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics, from which it will be seen that the song didn't begin as quoted, but that it was the punchline at the end.  The date suggested is Barry Day's.

EVERYBODY'S JAZZING MAD (c.1919)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics, two long-ish verses and a single refrain, of a snappy rhythmic quality which has definite musical implications.  Its mood - and a couple of specific lyrics - are later re-echoed in THE SAGGIE BOO (see LITTLE BAGGY MAGGY in Appendix 1e below).

GOLDENEYE CALYPSO (1952)
Published in NCCV p.78
Cole Lesley dated the number precisely to Ian Fleming and Anne Rothermere's wedding  (March 24th 1952), and the lyric is of course fully quoted in BD.   Something with the title 'Calypso' may be assumed to have had musical backing; and the lyrics fit very neatly to the tune and rhythm of the later (1961) 'Beatnik Love Affair' from Sail Away;  so it may not be too much to suggest a link between the two.

GOODBYE, OLD FRIEND (1945?)
A song surviving only in lyric form as part of an unproduced sketch, possibly intended for Sigh No More.  Sung by a theatrical lady, it pokes reminiscent fun at wartime performances under the auspices of ENSA.  There is a 'flashback' scene where squads of marching ENSA artists sing a rousing chorus, FIGHTING FOR ENSA.

I'M A SPY (1938?)
The song was intended for part of the sketch, 'Secret Service' from Set to Music, 1938-39 but the sketch was only ever used without the song, and the music has regrettably been lost.
           
I'M NOT THAT KIND OF GIRL (1922?)
The lyric is preserved in the Estate archives among material for London Calling!, 1923. The number is described as a ‘Dancing Duet’
IF ONLY A GIRL COULD BE SURE (1946)
The song was mapped out for inclusion in Pacific 1860, to be sung by the 'big girl', Penelope, but was unused, and the music has never surfaced.

IF WE'D MET (1961)
A duet for Verity and Johnny included in plans for Sail Away, but which was dropped even before rehearsals.  A verse section introduces two quite long refrains; the subject is the inevitability of those two particular characters loving each other no matter where they'd met.

IT'S ONLY ME (early 1920's)
The late Earl Amherst, reminiscing about his early friendship with Coward to Philip Hoare, had a clear recollection of this song: "We walked back to the house...Noël played and sang...I remember two songs which I do not think he ever subsequently used...[one of which was], "I thought you might be lonely/So I came along to see/It's only me/It's  only me"".  This was the only record of such a song having existed until the recent unearthing of a clearly matching lyric (from the "Mum's Suitcase" notebooks) by Barry Day.
(The other song mentioned by Amherst is HE NEVER DID THAT TO ME.)

LADY (1923?)
This lyric was found among material for London Calling! The number was submitted to the Lord Chamberlain's office, but never used.

LADY CLEMENTI (1930)
According to Earl Amherst, quoted by Philip Hoare (PH p.216) Coward wrote this 'revenge' song in Singapore in 1930 after appearing with the Quaints company in a production of Sherriff's Journey's End.  The song was composed after an altercation at Government House with the puritanical governor's wife, Lady Clementi, over the play and his appearance in it.  Amherst remembered that "Noël sang this at various parties.  All the grander and rather more elderly ladies would exclaim, 'Oh disgraceful, disgraceful!  Sing it again, Mr Coward, please sing it AGAIN.'"  The other song known to have been written on the same journey was MAD DOGS AND ENGLISHMEN.

LET'S HAVE ONE MORE TRY (1960/61)
An item included in a draft script for Sail Away . The lyrics indicate a duet between 'Mimi' and a male character 'Skid' whose origins lie in the abortive Later Than Spring of the year before.

LIFE WITHOUT LOVE (1963)
A number surviving only as a lyric which was intended for inclusion in The Girl Who Came to Supper.  It was to be sung by the Regent, and may have been an earlier run (because very similar in sentiment) at the piece which finally emerged as LONELY.

LITTLE GIRL (c.1920)
A dialogue between "He" and "She" - two verses and one refrain survive.

LONG AGO (1950's)
A typewritten lyric sheet for a single refrain survives.

LONG LIVE THE BOURGEOISIE (1949)
This song was mapped out for inclusion in Hoi Polloi, the forerunner to Ace of Clubs, but did not survive its transmogrification. The typewritten lyric sheet in the archives specifies the Verse section to be shared between 'Solo' and 'chorus'.   It is a sort of early  lyric variety of what later came to fruition in 'Don't Make Fun of the Fair', and includes a joke at his own expense ("We've even sat through Cavalcade by Mr Noël Coward").  Very much a revue song.

MAUDIE (EVERYTHING'S CLOSING DOWN) (1949)
A piece mapped out for inclusion in the abortive Hoi Polloi, which did not make the transfer to the re-jigged Ace of Clubs, about a reluctant and decidedly unco-operative barmaid.  (See also TIME, GENTLEMEN, PLEASE below, for which it may have been an alternative number.)

MONKEYS (1916?)
An early collaboration betwen Esmé Wynne (lyrics) and Coward (music), which has disappeared without trace.  The only evidence of any performance comes from Esmé's son, Jon Wynne-Tyson, who in 1995 came across material suggesting that a duet of this title was performed by EW and NC at a charity performance.  The lyric is at the Theatre Museum (London).

NO MORE (c.1919)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics, two verses and refrains shown.

OLD SCOTTISH AIR (1954?)
A typewritten lyric sheet  surfaced among Norman Hackforth's papers, among a sheaf of other material which related to the 1950's Café de Paris cabaret programmes - running orders, lyric sheets, song vocal-lines and two or three complete song copies in manuscript.  JESSIE HOOPER, a 1924 'Scottish' number with comic potential, is one such complete MS in this collection, and is mentioned in a planned running-order; so it is possible that this song (also comic Scottish, and presumably a new work at the time) was dropped in favour of the pre-existing one.  Also, this one's lyrics are probably just  a wee bit too daring, even for a sophisticated London audience in the early 1950's (see BD).
                       
PARK YOUR FANNY (1923?)
The lyrics for this are quoted by Barry Day, and were intended for use in London Calling!.  It is a sort of parody of an American musical song, and as such may just have some connection with the otherwise mysterious 'LITTLE BAGGY MAGGY' (see Appendix 1e below)

PATTERSON, PENNSYLVANIA (1961)
A number included in plans for Sail Away which never reached rehearsal.  The lyric shares the same theme as 'Why Do The Wrong People Travel?'.

PINK MALMAISONS
See THAT WAS BEFORE YOUR DAY below

PUT NOT YOUR TRUST IN PRINCES (July 1962)
Surviving only as a lyric, this song was intended for early in Act I of The Girl Who Came to Supper, after Mary receives her invitation to supper at the Carpathian Legation - and is warned by her showgirl friends about the dangers of such situations.  NC mentions in his diaries: "...I am thoroughly enthusiastic and have already done a good point number, 'Put Not Your Trust in Princes', and a lovely ballad with no lyrics as yet". [Monday 16 July 1962]

PUT OUT MY SHOOTING SUIT, WALTERS (1932?)
Lyric for a dialogue between a country gent and his manservant concerning the misdemeanours of his daughter, apparently intended for inclusion in Words and Music and then Set To Music (1932/1938) but not ultimately used in either.  The lyrics fall into a clear 6/8 rhythmic pattern, and were probably intended to be spoken over an appropriate musical backing.

REVE DE PIERROT (LA) (January 1916)

An early collaboration between Esmé Wynne (lyrics) and Noël Coward (music), of which only the lyrics survive.  The typewritten lyric sheet (suggesting that music would have been set) was among some material relating to Wynne and Coward that was obtained by the Theatre Museum of London in 1995. 

SAGGIE BOO, THE (1923?)
The lyrics for this (quoted by Barry Day) were intended for use in London Calling!.  It is a sort of parody of an American musical song, and as such may have some connection with the otherwise mysterious LITTLE BAGGY MAGGY (see Appendix 1e below)

SUNDAY AFTERNOONS (1949)
Written for Hoi Polloi, but it did not survive the show's re-working into Ace of Clubs; despite Coward rewriting the lyric as late as January 14th 1950 [NCD]. 

SUSIE SUNSHINE (c.1919)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics recently unearthed by Barry Day, showing rhythmic conformity through three verse and  refrain sections.

SWISS FAMILY WHITTLEBOT (1922/23)
from sketch in London Calling! 
The sketch certainly included some sort of "music", but whether of any structured compositional nature or merely extemporised by the performers is unclear.  The piece, burlesquing the 'Facade' performances of the Sitwells, was found hugely comic by audiences at the time, leading to much bad feeling on the part of the Sitwells and an ongoing "feud" in which Coward's contribution was continuing to publish lampoon verses by 'Hernia Whittlebot'.  CSL prints the sketch in full, and shows directions for musical accompaniment "in fitful gusts";  there is also a "musical interlude" specified.  Photographs of the production show odd musical instruments (such as the 'Conphutican') being "played".
A later performance of this sketch (BBC Radio production ‘The Book Show’, 1970's) had music written by William Blezard, because the original "music" had vanished without trace, if indeed any had ever existed.

TELL ME IF YOU KNEW (1920's)
The lyric (a single verse and refrain) looks rhythmically uneasy on the page, which with a sentimental ballad can often  be a good indication that a definite musical idea was attached.  (Coward commented that such lyrics without their music "may appear to be suddenly erratic, inept or even nonsensical.")

THAT IS THE TIME TO GO (1920's)
A long typewritten refrain survives, whose main interest is that the lyric sentiments are very similar to SAIL AWAY of nearly thirty years later: "When the skies look grey / That is the moment to rise away..."

THAT WAS BEFORE YOUR DAY (1942?)
(PINK MALMAISONS)
A number which was part of the early 40's abortive Samolan Operette,  which was later reworked into Pacific  1860.  A short lyric refrain survives in the archives. (A malmaison is a type of rose, named after Josephine's chateau.)

THERE ARE GOOD TIMES COMING (1960)
The song was intended for inclusion in Later Than Spring, which evolved into Sail Away, but the song did not survive the rewriting.  Only a short section of lyrics remains, which is a brisk trio probably in 6/8 time.

TIME, GENTLEMEN, PLEASE (1949)
This song was mapped out for inclusion in Hoi Polloi, the abortive forerunner to Ace of Clubs, but it did not survive the reworking, and no more than the lyric was recorded.

URSULINE (1946)
See note on main index under 'JOSEPHINE'

VIOLETS (1920's)
Intended for inclusion in a revue, but didn't get there.  Two verses and refrains survive.

WALTZING (1945)
The song was intended for inclusion in Sigh No More, 1945.  The lyrics were submitted with all the other material for Sigh No More  to the Lord Chamberlain's office, but the number was not used even in the Manchester try-out (from which a good deal of other material was also dropped).  The music has never surfaced.

WE LIVE OUR LIVES IN CITY STREETS (1949)
One of the songs mapped out for inclusion in Hoi Polloi, which did not make the transition when the show was transmogrified into Ace of Clubs.  It was sung by a chorus of fruit and veg. sellers in Covent Garden market.

WE'VE GOT THE COUNTRY AT THE CORNER OF THE STREET
See 'CORNER OF THE STREET on main index.
WHAT A SAUCY GIRL (STEADY, STEADY, MARY BAKER EDDY) (1951)
The story of this song's genesis is told by Cole Lesley in his 1976 biography of NC.  It was sent (as a joke at the expense of the Christian Science movement) to Cole when he was ill, along with pain-killers, and was apparently sung to him by Noël "with gusto to a racy tune."

WOMAN OF THE WORLD (1930's)
One regrets the survival only of the lyric, since it is one with satisfying rhymes and a mondaine sense of wit crying out for supporting music, which we suspect it must surely have had.

YOU AND YOU ALONE (1950's)
A short refrain survives on a typewritten lyric sheet