E

EENY MEENY MINY MO

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(1928/29)
Bitter Sweet, 1929 (Act 1 Finale) (Girls' chorus)
VS
First part of Act I Finale, in which the bridesmaids and Sarah play Blind Man's Buff at the very end of the party.
Sequences in fast-changing keys where the girls draw lots by playing 'eeny meeny miny mo' to decide who remains as "he" are punctuated by their declaring "This is the loveliest part of the party" in home key harmonies. As the other girls blindfold Sarah's eyes and prepare the game the music changes to a fast waltz in Eb characterised by a rising melody on the chord notes of Fm7/9 - except that during one of Sarah's solos this is subtly changed to include a diminished 5th. This is a fine, dancing waltz, worthy of one of those Strausses.
The game itself is played to a repeat of the first music. It is interrupted suddenly when Sarah bumps into Carl by mistake, he kisses her, and she finally realises that it is he whom she has been in love with "now and always".
At this point in the score there is a positively Wagnerian moment of modulation which Norman Hackforth suggested may have been Elsie April's attempt to 'sole and heel' a sticky transition to E major for Sarah and Carl's duet SHOULD HAPPINESS FORSAKE ME (qv) which folows, as do another interlude including bridesmaids' interjections, a reprise of I'LL SEE YOU AGAIN, the FOOTMEN QUARTET, a reprise of the start of THE LAST DANCE and finally a reprise, for Sarah and Carl as they elope, of THE CALL OF LIFE.
ONR 01 cuts down the start of all this considerably, but you get the basic outline.
ONR 01: + New Sadler's Wells Orch. (1988)

ELDORADO
See Appendix 1.a

ELIZABETH MAY
See Appendix 1.b

EMILY MARRIED A DOCTOR
See DRINKING SONG

ENGLISH LESSON

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(1933)
Conversation Piece, 1934 (Yvonne Printemps)
VS (music No.8, Act I)
An apparently artless allegretto in C major with Melanie singing fast scale passages to "la la la" (with a hint of melody from the end of the verse section of 'I'll See You Again') leads to Melanie practising simple dislocated English phrases and commenting in French on the impossibility of the language (shades of 'Useless Phrases' 27 years later). The apparently artless allegretto wafts through a couple of passages in G# before ending, surprisingly, in E major.
OCR 08/NCR 12: Yvonne Printemps (1934)
ONR 06: Lily Pons + orch. cond. Engel (1951)

ENGLISH LIDO

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(1927)
This Year of Grace, 1928
Act II Scene 2 opening chorus
VS
Lyrics in NCSL
The scene (though not the music) is a direct lampoon of the earlier scene which opens Act II, 'The Lido Beach'. As you might expect on an English rather than an Italian beach, there are badly-behaved children and a lot of politically incorrect smacking. An official complains about a little boy going nude - "Well, it's coming to something if a child of ten can't enjoy a state of nature without giving a lot of old ladies ideas." "England don't 'old with states of nature".
The main chorus refrain sums up NC's dispproval of staid English tolerance: "The thought of anything experimental, or Continental, we shun./ We take to innovations very badly,/ We'd rather be uncomfortable than not,". The musical construction is a standard 32-bar pattern firmly in Eb.
The scene continues after the Opening Chorus, and the song MOTHER'S COMPLAINT (qv) follows, then after a short dialogue, a finale with number for Daisy Kipshaw, the cross-channel swimmer, BRITANNIA RULES THE WAVES (qv)

ENTR'ACTE(S)

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(1962)
The Girl Who Came To Supper, 1963
Unpubl. MS
This is the opening music to Act II: subtitled "A la Strauss", it is based on the tunes of I'VE BEEN INVITED TO A PARTY, SATURDAY NIGHT AT THE ROSE AND CROWN and HERE AND NOW. There is another (older?) Entr'acte among the TG mss. in archive, much shorter and based only on the melody of the verse section of HERE AND NOW, which was presumably dropped in favour of this more extended version. Among the mss. there is also a piece titled NEW YORK ENTR'ACTE which is a brassy rum-te-tum number based on the tune of LONDON IS A LITTLE BIT OF ALLRIGHT featuring a vigorous ending which does not seem to be derivitive from anything else.
It is difficult to judge how much (if any) of this may have been the work of attendant musicians such as Peter Matz, rather than specific NC new composition,

ENTRANCE OF PAUL

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(1933)
Conversation Piece,1934 (Act I Scene 3)
VS
MUSICAL NOTES: Instrumental Tableau, with some conversation over. A sprightly little theme in Eb with the melody in thirds does at one point slip into Cb major. Another instrumental tableau follows, covering Melanie's entrance and the conversation between her and Paul just before Music No.2 - the conversation and introduction for 'I'll Follow My Secret Heart'. Melanie's entrance is accompanied by a complete refrain of 'I'll Follow My Secret Heart'.
(ONR 06)

ENTRANCE OF S.S. MEN
See MYSTERIOSO on Appendix 1.e

EVEN CLERGYMEN ARE NAUGHTY NOW AND THEN
See Appendix 1.e

EVENING IN SUMMER

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(1949/50)
Ace of Clubs, 1950 (Sylvia Cecil)
Sep.Publ. (though apparently rather later than the other six separately published numbers from the show)
The song is sung by Rita, the club owner. There is no real dramatic point to the number in the show, apart from general pleasantness; but I'm not convinced that it works terribly well, even on that level, as the verse section of the song is musically directionless, with frequent wayward keyshifts, and the lyric of the refrain is a rather anodyne sequence of short lines which clearly failed to attract to themselves a melody of much scope or depth. There's nothing wrong with it - just not terribly much very right.
OCR 14: Sylvia Cecil (1950)
ONR 22: Nancy Andrews & The Satisfactions (1968)
ONR 45: Steve Ross (1990)

EVERMORE AND A DAY
(PEACE ENFOLD YOU)

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1928?
Bitter Sweet, 1929 (Peggy Wood and George Metaxa)
The number was cut from the UK prod. but included in NY
publ. as supplement in VS
The number is the first of two, which follow Manon and Carls' flirting and Manon's song ('If Love Were All') in Act II Scene 1, in which Carl promises to take Sari away from Herr Schlick's café and the threat of its seamier side. The song is, if you like, the "real emotion" tender-feeling first part of which the second part is the dramatic lightening of the winsomely melodic 'Dear Little Café'.
That is not to say that this song does not have its own winsomeness. The introductory verse section - conversational endearments between the lovers - is a succinct musical prototype of all the similar aria-prologues in (for example) Pacific 1860 and After The Ball which were to follow in later years, showing characteristic Coward elements such as fleeting sideways keyshifts within a framework that actually doesn't shift far at all from a simple home, and "big" melodic elements which are to some extent shared and dovetailed between singers and the instrumental accompaniment. The refrain-aria itself is a gentle, swinging barcarolle, or perhaps a berceuse, with which Fauré might have been pleased. A touch of deeper feeling is supplied by a subtle change in the harmonic background: in the expected sunny major-key relationship Eb ma/Ab ma/Bb ma7/Eb, the Ab is instead in the minor.
There are excellent melodic elements, too, e.g. elegant rising intervals (first 7ths and then an octave) at the ends of lines in the “middle 8” which is then echoed by the brilliant touch of a rising 5th (on “stolen a-way”) which comes to rest on the 9th of a chord of Eb (F). These are all little (and when described so specifically, rather tedious!) things, but they add up to a more than wholesome whole. The Refrain has a nicely extended ending, and the title of the song comes from the final words of the Refrain.
A very underrated song, because largely unknown. It would be nice to hear it attempted by real singers! There is an intriguing reference in an unpublished Diaries extract on December 12th 1945, which says that “Graham and Irlin Hall have made a record of ‘Peace Enfold You’ ... and it is really charming”; but the authors have never come across such a recording.
ONR 46: Graham Payn & Joyce Grenfell (1947)

EVERYBODY'S JAZZING MAD
See Appendix 1.b

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