I (page 3)

IF ONLY MRS APPLEJOHN WERE HERE

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DISCOGRAPHY:

1962, in the form of FREE SPEECH (qv), the middle verse section of whose musical material it reuses
intended for The Girl Who Came to Supper 1963 but it did not survive rehearsals
Unpubl. MS
NCR 46 preserves the song in this form, and it's a bit of a mystery why the FREE SPEECH version still existed in MS with the rest of the MS material during preparations for TG. It could be that a whole series of MSS were prepared in, say, Jamaica during 1962 before the demo tape was made in April 1963.
The original title words "Free speech, free religion, free press" are preserved as part of the wordy main refrain, but it becomes Mary's eulogy to her former schoolteacher Mrs Applejohn's political philosophies rather than Mary's own interpretation of American political freedoms, and dramatically it is a much more convincing way of presenting the same material. The Prince Regent uses a repetition of the same musical material to lampoon Mary's beliefs and attitudes. It is a dramatic, conversational piece of writing, whose music is pleasant enough and a well-fitting vehicle for the words but which lacks memorability.
NCR 46: pno. acc. unknown (1963)

IF WE COULD ONLY BE JUST PEOPLE
see JUST PEOPLE

IF WE'D MET
see Appendix 1.b

IF YOU COULD ONLY COME WITH ME

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DISCOGRAPHY:

(1928)
Bitter Sweet, 1929 (Act 1 Sc.2) (George Metaxa)
VS
NCSB
A wistful colla voce ballad-aria with some surprising harmonic shifts and juxtapositions. This is a short piece, consisting only of a repeated 8-bar phrase with a slightly extended ending, but its simplicity is the key to its effectiveness. The delight of the piece is in the subtle chromatic shifts in both accompanying harmonies and the melodic lines which allow seamless and slightly "bitter-sweet" shifts between two "incompatible" keys. The vocal line weaves a melodic web around held chords in the accompaniment, and is given an exotic modal touch in its last descending phrase, which at the end becomes a rising whole-tone scale, vanishing into a dreamy stratosphere.
OCR 05: George Metaxa (1929)
NCR 09: acc. Ray Noble (1932)
ONR 02: James Pease + orch (1961)
ONR 03: Roberto Cardinali + orch (1962)
ONR 23: Ian Bostridge acc. Jeffrey Tate (2002)

IF YOU WILL BE MY MORGANATIC WIFE
see Appendix 1.a

IMAGINE THE DUCHESS'S FEELINGS

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DISCOGRAPHY:

London, c. 12 July 1941[CL]
No Show
Sep.Publ.1941
STA
NCG2
Further to CL above, pages of the Noel Coward Diaries which remained unpublished make clear the extraordinary burst of concentrated – and effective! – songwriting that Coward undertook at this time.  Between June 2nd and July 21 all four of the main batch of “wartime” songs – ‘London Pride’, ‘Could You Please Oblige Us With a Bren Gun?’, ‘There Have Been Songs in England’ and this one – went from inspiration to publication and/or recording. ‘Duchess’ appears to have been started around July 12th, had a further two verses written on the 19th, and the finished product was dictated to an amanuensis at Chappells on the 21st. This is a delightfully underplayed comedy song, and oddly little known (though its lyrics are no more dated than many other better-known songs'). In some ways it is the joker among the mid-war compositions, being neither patriotic (LONDON PRIDE and THERE HAVE BEEN SONGS...) nor exactly burlesque (DON'T LET'S BE BEASTLY... and COULD YOU PLEASE OBLIGE US...).
A verse showing NC at his most inventive, with three utterly different melodic/rhythmic themes in close succession, leads into a refrain which presages much of NC's best post-war comedy cabaret works, and which suffers only from lack of lyric length and therefore thematic musical development - the refrain seems to "need" a middle eight-bar section which it does not possess, and one is surprised that its end comes quite so soon. The lyrics are quite clever, with each of the three verses finding different ways of including the words 'white', 'blue' and 'red' in the final couplet when comparing the attributes of the duchess's three sons.
Carroll Gibbons' accompaniment on NCR 23 is peerless - among other merits a very good demonstration of how to accompany without doubling the melody.
NCR 23: acc. Carroll Gibbons (1941)
ONR 32a: Harry Noble acc. Stuart Ross (1953)
ONR 05: Bobby Short (1972)

IN A BOAT ON A LAKE WITH MY DARLING

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DISCOGRAPHY:


(June/July 1950)
Ace of Clubs, 1950 (club floorshow) (Jean Carson and Myles Eason)
Sep.Publ.
VS CC
This song was not in the pre-London show, but by the time it reached London (July 7th) the number had been slotted in before I LIKE AMERICA to become the second half opener. It is perhaps questionable whether it is better for the purpose than what it replaced.
I have always had misgivings about the inherent quality of this song. Again, there is nothing that jars, nothing actually wrong with structure, lyric or melody, just not anything particularly developed or pleasingly right with it. The main refrain-line rhyme of 'Darling' with 'starling' is perhaps rather lame and unconvincing. In fact the song's lyric, in common with some other AoC numbers, is altogether rather anodyne. Diaries entries suggest that he tackled the writing of this show with a no-nonsense approach, trying to construct a story specifically angled to catch a more modern mood. I think this song demonstrates that his heart was not really in it.
The refrain melody is smooth and steady in flowing 2/2 tempo, thematically integrated around the pattern of its first three notes, a rising fourth that drops back onto the third. But because of the structure of the lyrics it doesn't have time to go anywhere much. The first eight-bar phrase is well-complemented by another, and there is surely potential for further musical development at this point; but instead we get only a repetition of the theme and its balancing end-phrase - and that's that!
OCR 14: Pat Kirkwood & Graham Payn (1950)
ONR 71a: Graham Payn + orch, intro. By NC

IN WHICH WE SERVE
(See entry on Appendix 1.d for further notes on the unused music, and also HEAVENLY MOMENT in main index above)

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DISCOGRAPHY:

1942
Film Soundtrack, 1942
Pno.sel. (Arr. Elsie April) publ. 1942
The published piano selection presented several of the soundtrack's musical themes:
1) Flotilla
2) Ship Theme
3) Shipyard Music
4) Kinross Home
5) Shorty And Freda
6) Waltz Theme (unnamed)
7) Ship Theme
As one might imagine, the actual use of music on the soundtrack is rather more complex than represented in the above, with repeated re-uses of the more significant themes. A significant theme on the soudtrack which was not included in the piano selection is OFFICER'S THEME, and episodes known (in the manuscript sketches) as RIPPLE No.1 and COMMISSIONING are also featured on the soundtrack. No.6 above, WALTZ THEME, was originally titled as SHORTY AND FREDA's theme, while No.5 was originally known as just SHORTY BLAKE. Entries in the Noel Coward Diaries which remained unpublished reveal that the bulk of the composition of the score occurred during May-June 1942.  On June 6th NC “dictated the ‘Ship’ theme to Elsie [April]. I have taken her back into the fold, poor old girl. She knows my music better than anyone else and I feel a bit sorry for her, anyway”, and there are several other references of the nature “worked all day at music with Elsie”.  The score was complete enough to show to Muir Mathieson, who was to conduct it, on July 1st.  MM was apparently “delighted with the music”.
ONR 72: Mantovani Orch. (1947)

INCIDENTAL MUSIC
see Appendix 1.d

INCIDENTAL MUSIC (PACIFIC 1860)

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(1946)
Pacific 1860, 1946
Publ.VS
1. Betw. 'This is a Night' and 'I Never Knew' (Act II)
2. Betw. 'Gipsy Melody' and 'My Horse...' (reprise) (Act III)
3. Betw. 'Wedding Chorus' and 'Finale' (Act III)
The first two of these are fairly marginal compositions, one covering some dialogue and both including snatches of other waltz themes. The third is a longer (60-bar) allegro moderato passage in swinging 6/8 tempo with two fully-developed new themes, in Eb and C.

INCIDENTAL MUSIC (SHADOW PLAY)

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(1935?)
unused?
(Unpubl.) MS in Estate archives (Elsie April)
Though the ascriptions on the MS are specific, I have not been able to establish where in the play this music might have been placed, nor if in fact it was ever used.
It is a lush, romantic mood-piece, richly chordal, and directed to be played "nice and swoony". Four introductory bars in Ab switch straight into a main theme in A, which itself does a great deal more keyshifting during its 26 bars. Some short figurations for three muted horns a la Richard Strauss are detailed on a separate line, and other parts of the piece have orchestration notes at various points. It ends quietly and firmly in C. It would certainly have fitted the mood of the play, and has strong links with the shifting, foggy harmonic direction of the song 'Then'.

INTERLUDE/ ENTRANCE OF BURROWS

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(1935)
Tonight at 8:30: Family Album
Publ.VS (Music Nos. 4 - 5 - 6)
All extremely short and the music of 'Emily Married...'

INTRODUCTION AND HORNPIPE
(SAILOR)

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Early Dec. 1958, New York [NCD]
London Morning (ballet) Music Nos.5 and 6
Publ.pno.score. No. 5/6
Exactly what it says on the packet. I suppose one could count it as another pastiche.
OCR 17: LPO Cond. Corbett (1959)
ONR 11: Prague Phil. Cond. Robin White (1995)

INTRODUCTION AND MAZURKA
(TARTS & BUSINESSMEN)

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DISCOGRAPHY:

Sept/Oct 1958, Bermuda [NCD]
London Morning (ballet) Music Nos. 3 and 4
Publ.pno.score. No 3/4
A Policeman moves the crowds along, followed by the Mazurka. Another pastiche, and a good one. Satisfyingly and convincingly maintained through different phrases over nearly 150 bars of music.
OCR 17: LPO Cond. Corbett (1959)
ONR 11: Prague Phil. Cond. Robin White (1995)

INVITATION TO THE WALTZ

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DISCOGRAPHY:

(1946)
Pacific 1860, 1946 (Act II chorus opening)
Publ.VS
+ extract in sep. publ. Pno.Sel.
Chorus waltz. A flirtacious dialogue between the girls and the men leads into a Dance on the same music. All the music is more briefly reprised in the third act in the full chorus number THIS IS THE NIGHT (which passes rather roguish comments on the eve of the big wedding). Two main themes (in C and Ab respectively) are alternated, and the music is set to various pairings or full combinations of voice parts. The second half of the Ab theme has a Viennese post-Bitter Sweet charm, with the female voices bouncing off an empty first beat with little rushes of upwards notes in thirds, which is later developed into a more extended passage where they sing "tra-la-la"'s over a male counter-melody.
OCR 13: Chorus (1946)

IRISH SONG

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DISCOGRAPHY:

1954
Café de Paris, 1954
An Evening with Beatrice Lillie (1954)
VS CC
The idea for a character called Rosie O'Grady dates from the composition of After The Ball around New Year 1954. (The tune of the song LONDON AT NIGHT was originally set to a lyric about a woman called Rosie O'Grady.) It seems clear that this was one of the three "new" NC songs that BL mentioned were included that year in her one-woman show An Evening With Beatrice Lillie. NC himself noted in passing his own use of it "at the Café de Paris last Monday ... the new songs all went wonderfully and 'Piccola Marina' is obviously a rouser" [NCD, 24 Oct 54] . Its charm lies in the irreverent and surprising non-sequitor punchlines, all of which of course rhyme delightfully with their set up lines.
It is a comedian's song - very theatrical: anticipating the audience and timing the delivery of punchlines is everything.
ONR 73: Beatrice Lillie acc. Eadie & Rack (1955)
ONR 16a: Courtney Kenny (2001)

IS SHE HAPPY?
see Appendix 1.c

ISH CON BROSHKA
see CHAUVE-SOURIS

ISLAND OF BOLLAMAZOO, THE

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(1937)
Operette, 1938 (Edward Cooper & Chorus)
Publ.VS
Pastiche chorus-number (fast waltz), as if from a typical musical comedy of 1900. The subject is, broadly, all the delightful goings-on that can occur on a tropical island in the absence of civilized restraint. Three well-worked 32-bar comedy refrains, with little links between during which various stage exits and entrances take place.
ONR 26: Cook, Ross & Cason (Oh Coward!, 1972)

ISN'T THERE ANY LITTLE THING
see Appendix 1.a

IT DOESN'T MATTER HOW OLD YOU ARE

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(1927)
This Year of Grace, 1928 (Maisie Gay)
Publ. VS
CPA1
NCG2
A saucy revue point number for the older woman. It could be considered a second run on the idea of THERE'S LIFE IN THE OLD GIRL YET. This song was actually dropped in September 1928 from TYOG and replaced by a third similar number, WHAT LOVE MEANS... , which had originally been included in London Calling!
I do not know why it was dropped, unless her public were clamouring to hear Maisie Gay do 'What Love Means...' again, which is perfectly possible. It seems a little unfair, because 'It Doesn't Matter ...' is a pretty good song. Both verses (2) and refrains (3) are poised and pleasing. Definitely worth a revival in the right context.

IT ISN'T WHAT YOU DO
see Appendix 1.c

IT WAS HORRID
see Appendix 1.c

IT'S ALL VERY PRETTY
see MRS 'ARRIS

IT'S ALWAYS THE MAN THAT'S PURSUED

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(1934?)
Planned for inclusion in the 1934 US revival of Bitter Sweet in Washington, but cut before the production reached Broadway. Its place was in Act 2 in the café, immediately after IF LOVE WERE ALL.
The lyrics survive in copy of the book of BS held in the Schubert Archive, New York (& see BD)
MUSIC LOST
One wonders quite why the song was included in the first place - adding to an already tried and tested and successful show seems so superfluous - unless [as BD p.117 suggests] its intent was to provide a little light relief from an emotionally extended passage.

IT'S ONLY ME
see Appendix 1.b

ITALIAN CANZONETTA
see Appendix 1.d

ITALIAN INTERLUDE
also known as ITALIAN BALLET SEQUENCE or NEW TAORMINA

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(1961)
Sail Away, 1961
Unpubl. MS
The sequence of non-lyric dance music includes: a long TARANTELLE, ROCK & ROLL ("OH BAMBINO YO TIAMO"), DRINKING, another TARANTELLE, and PART II: GALOP. I am not quite sure where exactly in the show this sequence ran.

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