Q and R

QUADRILLE
(Incidental music for NC play of same name)

ORIGIN:
SOURCE:

June 1952 (NCD)
MUSIC LOST
There is no indication in the script where the music actually comes - there is certainly no mention of any music as part of the drama/script, so one assumes it came between scenes and/or Acts. There are four such breaks (disregarding intervals): between Sc.1 & Sc.2 of Act I, between Sc.1 and Sc.2 and between Sc.2 and Sc.3 of Act II, and between Sc.1 and Sc.2 of Act III.
A note that the music was "under the direction of Leslie Bridgewater" is given on programmes. Extensive efforts were made during the 1990s to track down where such music might still exist, including contacting the UK production company who mounted a revival, apparently with music, in 1977, but to no avail.

QUARTETTE
See OH WHAT A CENTURY IT'S BEEN

RAIN MUSIC
See ANDANTE

RASPBERRY TIME IN RUNCORN
See Appendix 1.e

REGENCY RAKES

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DISCOGRAPHY:


(1933)
Conversation Piece, 1934 (George Sanders, Pat Worsley, Antony Brian, Sydney Grammer)
Sep.Publ.
Conversation Piece VS
CPA2
NCSB
STA
NCG2
Also see THERE WAS ONCE A LITTLE VILLAGE whose refrain shares the same music.
A fast waltz comedy song with a good sense of swagger about it. In musical feeling it is more like ‘Chase Me Charlie’ than anything else that springs to mind. The characters present themselves as vulgar, boorish drunkards, and the music has strongly unsubtle elements within it which echo this impression, e.g. three bars of repeated accented notes in the Refrain main phrase and the sforzando off-beat emphases on the words ‘orgy-Georgie’ etc. in the “middle 8” phrase. The Refrain in particular also shows good extensions of rhyming/melodic rhythmic tags, with occasional lyric line overlaps.
This is certainly one of the lesser-known NC comedy songs, but quite as good in its own way as ‘His Excellency Regrets’.
ONR 08: Henry Hall + BBC Dance Orch (20 Feb 1934) (includes DANSER, DANSER)
OCR 08/NCR 12: Sidney Grammar, George Sanders, Pat Worsley & Antony Brian (26 Feb 1934)
NCR 32: + orch. cond. Lehman Engel (1951)

REMEMBER ME
See ALL MY LIFE AGO

REVE DE PIERROT, LA
See Appendix 1.b

RIBBON IN HER HAIR, A

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NOTES:

(1954?)
Graham Payn, in cabaret at the Café de Paris, 1955
Unpubl. MS
(Copyright registered at Chappell & Co. in 1955)
Miscellaneous revue-type song. NCL gives it as "1950's miscellaneous", but as it is Norman Hackforth's MS it must have been written down before 1955, by when his amanuensis work with NC had come to an end. We have guessed the composition date to be 1954 when after After the Ball there was a small spurt of comedy compositions at around the time of the last season at the Café de Paris.
This is a well-worked Verse and Refrain, celebrating the appearance of a great-aunt in an old photograph from her schooldays. In keeping with the nostalgic sentiment, the piece is graceful and not fast, and has the benefit of a precise and pleasing harmonic setting.
The song is so little known and of so little direct relevance to anything else that there would seem little chance of it now emerging from obscurity; but it would certainly be a deserving contender to be rescued and aired.

RIPPLE
See IN WHICH WE SERVE

ROOM WITH A VIEW, A

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DISCOGRAPHY:

1927, Honolulu [NCSB]
(Originally intended for inclusion in an abortive 1927 musical, Star Dust )
This Year Of Grace, 1928 (Jessie Matthews & Sonnie Hale, and in US production by NC/Billy Milton & Florence Desmond)
Sep. Publ. - also Sep.publ. as 'Pianoforte Transcription'
AES
SA1
NCSB
NCG1
VS CC
And see 'FINALE, This Year Of Grace' (London Production)
The song was parodied by Sandy Wilson in The Boy Friend - subtitled “an affectionate parody of the musicals of the 20's” - in the number 'Room in Bloomsbury'
“[It] was originally conceived on a lonely beach in Honolulu where I was convalescing after a nervous breakdown. The title, unblushingly pinched from E. M. Forster’s novel, came into my mind together with a musical phrase to fit it and I splashed up and down in the shallows, searching for shells and rhymes at the same time. When I was singing it in the American production of This Year Of Grace the late Alexander Woollcott took a black hatred to it. The last couplet ... sent him into torrents of vituperation. He implored me to banish the number from the show ... when I refused to pander to his wicked prejudices he decided to make a more formal protest ... one evening he sat in a stage box with a group of ramshakle companions, including Harpo Marx, and when I began to sing the verse they all, with one acord, ostentatiously opened newspapers and read them ... with what I still consider to be great presence of mind, [I] sang the last couplet in baby talk, whereupon Woollcott gave a dreadful scream and, making sounds only too indicative of rising nausea, staggered from the box.” [NCSB]
It is a sign of NC’s extraordinary range as a composer that this sunny, apparently artless song could have been penned by the same person who also gives us the sophisticated dexterity of ‘Mad Dogs’ or ‘Mrs Worthington’. The whole has a touching openness of phrase, cadence and lyric rhyming which manages to add up to considerably more than the sum of its parts. The rhyming is well structured, with internal rhymes as well as line-end rhymes on the larger scale, and internal rhymes are well-matched with melodic patterns which exist within larger melodic phrases, and the lyric and melodic lines often overlap or extend themselves to accomodate their partners. This is a lyric which looks disjointed when written out on its own, but which makes perfect sense when married with its music.
This song displays one of the most obvious uses in NC’s music of his “favourite” dominant chord with a sharpened fifth note, used at the cadence into the Refrain.
The sheet-music edition was “improved” for its inclusion in NCSB in 1954 by Norman Hackforth, where the accompaniment shows less “bounce” and slightly richer harmonisation at certain points, and some of the original accompaniment figurations were dropped.
There are many recent recordings, but not many of which find their way on to the “recommendations” below. It’s an easy song to over-sing, which perhaps Bostridge does (ONR 23) while proving at the same time that it can be a song with considerable mileage for trained singers. Paul McCartney's recent recording (ONR 31) is one of the better ones - surprisingly reminiscent of the Beatles in 'Honey Pie', but none the worse for that, and you hear the words clearly and he sings beautifully in tune.
This song ranks about eighth in the list of top Coward royalty earners today (see Appendix 3).
NCR 01: acc. orch. cond. Carroll Gibbons (Apr.1928)
ONR 08: (concert arrgt.) Jack Jackson orch. (Sept 1928)
OCR 04: (in medley) orch.cond. Ernest Irving (1928)
ONR107: Dick Maxwell + Fred Elizalde orch. (1928)
NCR 09: (in medley) acc. Ray Noble (1932)
ONR108: Hildegarde + Ray Sinatra orch. (1939)
ONR 24: Graham Payn & Joyce Grenfell + orch. (1947)
NCR 34: (in medley) pno.acc. Norman Hackforth (1951)
ONR 32a: Harry Noble acc. Stuart Ross (1954)
NCR 37: Wally Stott Orch. acc. Hackforth (1954)
NCR 38: acc. Peter Matz (Las Vegas1955) (& in medley)
NCR 39: (in medley) acc. Norman Hackforth (1958)
ONR 07: Laurel Ford & Geoffrey Burridge (C Custard 1972)
ONR109: Irene Kral + Loonis McGlohon Trio (1977)
ONR 31: Paul McCartney (1998)
ONR 28: Barbara Lea acc. Keith Ingham (1999)
ONR 23: Ian Bostridge & Sophie Daneman (2002)

ROSES HAVE MADE ME REMEMBER, THE

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(1924)
Charlot's Revue, 1924 (Maisie Gay)
Charlot's Revue of 1926 (New York) (Beatrice Lillie)
MUSIC LOST
part of AFTER DINNER MUSIC (q.v.)
A pastiche whose model was a 1916 love song by Herman Darewski, of the same title; but Darewski's second line ran "All that I tried to forget", while the flavour of Coward's version may be implied from his second line, "What any nice girl should forget". Maisie Gay presented a trio of songs in this sketch in which she impersonated the stage performances of Norah Bayes.

RUG OF PERSIA

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(1938)
Set To Music 1939 (USA) (Beatrice Lillie)
MUSIC LOST
This is a typical Lillie-esque comedy number – see the lyrics at BD p.194. The scene is a Persian harem, where a courtesan is found working at and singing about a large tapestry. At the end, and still singing madly, she catches her foot in a thread and the whole thing unravels behind her as she goes off. It is lyrically something of a direct ancestor of the deliberately silly number 'Spinning Song' which came into the Café de Paris cabaret shows in 1954

RUSSIAN BLUES

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DISCOGRAPHY:

1922
1923, London Calling! (NC)
Charlot’s 1926 Revue (Gertrude Lawrence & chorus)
Sep.Publ. 1923 and 1926
The song’s Refrain "middle 8" section is a direct quote of music taken from Borodin's 'Polovtsian Dances'. NC was doing this sort of thing a good deal at the time, and there are other obvious passages in other songs from the same show, e.g. designed to impart Spanish or French flavour with quotes from a Habanera and The Marseillaise. The presence of Russian refugees was, of course, still a strong and recent feature of life in 1922 London.
The song is well-worked, with good clear structure and melodic lines of pleasing openness. The contemporaneous sheet-music was the first music publication to bear the words “written and composed by Noël Coward” on the cover, and also has his picture on the front since it was himself who sang the piece in the revue. Most of this early published work also shows signs of the amanuensis’s input, and this piece in particular seems to bear some of Elsie April’s hallmarks, particularly in the little 4-bar introduction and her voicing of the dominant chord with a sharpened fifth, Coward’s most noticeable compositional hallmark, which makes an early and obvious appearance in this song.
The Verse section would have been fine at half its length, but is in effect completely repeated musically; the Refrain shows development of the melody throughout its four phrases and is not always set to entirely predictable harmonies. The “bluesiness” of the piece is provided by the melody’s final phrase, which passes through the Gb of the minor third on its way back to resting in Eb major.
ONR 08: Jack Hylton + orch. (1923)
ONR110: Gertrude Lawrence acc. R. H. Bowers (1925)

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